Grand Canyon National Park increases water restrictions: What visitors should know

Grand Canyon National Park increases water restrictions: What visitors should know

Grand Canyon National Park increases water restrictions: What visitors should know

Grand Canyon National Park visitors can expect to feel the effects of increased water restrictions after a series of breaks along a pipeline that delivers water to the park from 3,500 feet below the North Rim.

“DRINKING WATER AVAILABILITY IN THE CROSS-CANYON CORRIDOR IS LIMITED," the park wrote in red capital letters on its website Monday. A day earlier, the park noted that the aging Transcanyon waterline suffers multiple breaks each year.

Water spigots at the South Rim's Mather and Desert View Campgrounds will be turned off, and the Camper Services laundry and shower facility, run by Delaware North, will also be closed. The Grand Canyon has listed places where water is on or off on its website. 

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Visitors take in the view from the Grand Canyon's South Rim in this file photo from August 24, 2020.
 

Several conservation measures were already in place across the North and South Rims, including disposable dish and utensil use in restaurants, serving water only by request and cleaning hotel rooms with low-water-use methods, according to the park. All Xanterra concessions service and lodging in Phantom Ranch were closed till further notice.

"Visitors and residents may experience additional water conservation measures while visiting the park," the park added, asking people to help by taking short showers, turning the faucet off while brushing teeth and selectively flushing the toilet, among other measures.


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